Asian American Research Team
AART Past year graduate students
Graduate Researchers
Picture of Fanny Ng Fanny Ng, M.A. is an advanced graduate student in the Clinical Psychology program at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. She received her Bachelor's of Arts with a major in psychology and a minor in Studio Art from Stony Brook University. Fanny's clinical and research interests broadly include the study of the impact of race and racism on mental health in minority populations. Her master's thesis focused on race-related stress and its relation to racial identity, ethnic identity, and racism-related empowerment in Asian Americans. For her dissertation, she plans to examine the intersectional experiences of racism and sexism for Asian American women leaders. Fanny currently serves on the Asian Ameican Psychological Association's Board of Directors as the elected Student Representative, as organizer of the Student of Color meetings for the Clinical Psychology program, and as the research coordinator for the Asian American Research Team under Dr. Suyemoto. Fanny is a current reipient of a Minority Fellowship from the American Psychological Association.
Picture of Shruti Mukkamala Shruti Mukkamala, M.A. is an advanced graduate student in the Clinical Psychology Program at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. She is an international student from India and had a variety of experiences with research and clinical work prior to coming to UMass Boston. Shruti is currently completing her internship at the counseling center at California State University, Long Beach. She completed her third year practicum at Cambridge Health Alliance, Behavioral Medicine. In more recent years before internship, Shruti taught undergraduate Research Methods and Abnormal Psychology courses at UMass Boston. Shruti's dissertation is a multi-method qualitative study focused on the intersectional experience of racism and sexism for Asian American women. She is looking forward to completing her graduate training and working in an academic setting where she hopes to take her training in and passion for social justice to her teaching, clinical work, research and mentoring. Shruti enjoys watching movies, traveling and listening to Hindi film music in her free time and continues to work on her goal of leading a physically active and healthy life.
Picture of Chuck Liu Chuck Liu B.A. is a fourth year graduate student in the Clinical Psychology program at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. He received his Bachelor's of Arts majoring in psychology from Wheaton College. Chuck completed his third year practicum at South Shore Mental Health, with a particular emphasis on services for Asian Americans. He is continuing at South Shore this year, and teaching undergraduate Social Psychology at UMass Boston. Chuck's master’s thesis focused on how ethnic identity and generational status differentially affect the relationship between racism and mental health among Asian Americans. Chuck’s research and clinical interests focus on Asian Americans, including acculturative stress among immigrant families, the experience and effects of racism, and the intersection of social justice and spirituality.
Picture of Danielle Godon Danielle Godon, M.A. is a third year graduate student in the Clinical Psychology program at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. She received her Bachelor’s of Science in Business Administration from Bryant University and her Masters of Arts in psychology from Mount Holyoke College, where she completed a mixed-method thesis study that investigated sense of belonging and sense of exclusion in Korean transracial adoptees. Danielle is currently completing her third year practicum placement at the Carson Center for Human Services. She plans to continue studying issues focused on transracial adoptio and expand her research base by exploring race and racism and family socialization processes.
Picture of Alissa Gross Alissa Gross, B.A. is a third year graduate student in the Clinical Psychology Program at University of Massachusetts, Boston. She received her Bachelor's of Arts from Brandeis University, graduating with a major in Psychology and a minor in Hispanic and Latin American Studies. She is interested in issues of race and racism, and the process of becoming an ally, with a particular focus on children and adolescents. Her Master's thesis is a grounded theory study focusing on the process of being and becoming an ally. Alissa is currently completing her third year practicum placement at Brookline Community Health Center. She is also actively involved in advocacy to reduce gun violence and address the inequality with which inner city gun violence is addressed; she has testifyied at the State House and participated in initiatives aimed at educating teens about gun violence.
AART 2009
Doctoral Alumni
Picture of John Tawa John Tawa, Ph.D. is an assistant professor in the Psychology Department at Salve Regina University. He received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Massachusetts Boston in 2013. He completed his internship at South Shore Mental Health in 2012. Dr. Tawa's research focuses on race-relations between Black/African Americans and Asian/Asian Americans. This specific focus falls under a broader commitment to challenging 21st century racism through greater collaboration between oppressed groups. Dr. Tawa is a past fellow of the American Psychological Association Minority Fellowship Program and recipient of the Asian American Psychological Association Division of Students 2008 Student Researcher Award. He is the proud father of two daughters, Amaya Christine and Kalia Rain.
Picture of Vali Kahn Vali D. Kahn, Ph.D. is an adjunct professor at Lesley University, and Associate in Psychology at the Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical School and is currently setting up a private practice in Cambridge, MA. She received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Massachusetts Boston in 2012. Dr. Kahn completed her internship at Massachusetts Mental Health Center, Division of Public Psychiatry of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Department of Psychiatry at the Harvard Medical School where she worked with adults in the outpatient department and young adults and their families in the program for prevention and recovery of early psychosis. She completed her post-doctoral fellowship at the Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical School where she provided outpatient and inpatient psychological testing, individual therapy and helped to develop and facilitate research in the Psychodynamic Research Clinic. Dr. Kahn’s dissertation research explored the influence of contextual social negotiations of personal and ascribed identities on identity processes in multiracial and bisexual people. Her clinical interests include identity and developmental transitions in diverse populations, and working with individuals, couples and families.
Picture of Stephanie Day Stephanie C. Day, Ph.D. is a Staff Psychologist at the University of Houston-Clear Lake in Career and Counseling Services. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from UMass Boston in 2012. She completed her predoctoral internship at the Suffolk University Counseling Center and her postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Texas Medical Branch - Shriners Hospitals for Children, Galveston. Stephanie has clinical experience working with adults, children, and families from diverse backgrounds in a variety of settings. She completed a testing practicum placement in the Neuropsychological and Psychological Assessment service at Cambridge Hospital and clinical practicum placements at the UMass Boston Counseling Center and Cambridge Health Alliance. Stephanie approaches clinical work, research, and teaching with a strong social justice agenda and aims to increase understandings and empowerment of minority and marginalized populations. As an international, transracial Korean adoptee, Stephanie is particularly invested in developing an understanding of the racial and ethnic identities of Asian adoptees throughout the lifespan. Her doctoral dissertation explored the interactive processes of racial identities, ethnic identities, cultural affiliations and becoming first-time biological mothers among Korean adopted women. Stephanie's Master's thesis research examined the racial and ethnic identity development and social justice meanings and actions among Asian American youth participating in an empowerment program. In addition, she has advocated for minority youth on probation and their families and worked as a caseworker for adolescents dealing with mental illness. Stephanie also brought her interest in issues of diversity to teaching Introduction to Psychology and Adolescence for the Psychology program at UMass Boston.
Nancy J. Lin, Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist at the Naval Medical Center San Diego's OASIS Residential Program for the treatment of combat-related PTSD in active duty service members. Dr. Lin completed her doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology at the University of Massachusetts in 2010. Her Master's thesis focused on communication and transmission of trauma in Cambodian refugee families and her doctoral dissertation focused on normative developmental processes of identity devlopment in Sudanese and Cambodian refugees. She received her postdoctoral and internship training at the VA San Diego focusing on the treatment of military PTSD in pre-GWOT veterans and couples therapy. Dr. Lin later served as acting director of the OEF/OIF/OND (Operations Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom, and New Dawn) clinic at VA San Diego Healthcare System in 2011, with a concurrent faculty appointment in the University of California San Diego's School of Medicine as a researcher, clinician, and trainee supervisor in the areas of evidence based treatment of PTSD, insomnia and nightmares. During this time, she also served as a clinician in the military sexual trauma clinic. Her area of interest is in the psychological consequences of trauma, especially contextualized normative responses and strength-based approaches to understanding chronic exposure to war in diverse cultures. In addition to completing her doctoral degree at UMass Boston, she also holds a Master's degree in medical anthropology from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Dr. Lin is a past fellow of the American Psychological Association Minority Fellowship Program. In her spare time, Dr. Lin enjoys teaching and has had the pleasure of doing so at the University of Southern California's School of Social Work.
Picture of Phuong Nguyen Phuong T. Nguyen, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Baylor College of Medicine, and staff psychologist at Ben Taub General Hospital. Prior to coming to Baylor College of Medicine, Dr. Nguyen was the Director of Clinical Services at Asian American Family Services, a mental health and social service agency dedicated to enhancing the mental health and social well-being of Houston-area Asians/Asian Americans. Dr. Nguyen received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Massachusetts Boston in 2009, and completed a predoctoral internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. During his time at UMASS-Boston he trained at South Cove Community Health Center in Boston's Chinatown and the Asian Clinic at Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical School where he conducted individual/family therapy and psychological assessments with clients from diverse backgrounds, including Vietnamese clients. Dr. Nguyen’s research interests stem from his desire to better understand the psychological experiences of Asian Americans, including identity development, acculturation processes, mental heath and illness, and refugee trauma. Given Dr. Nguyen’s Vietnamese refugee background, he has a particular interest in examining the psychological experiences of Vietnamese people in the U.S. His doctoral dissertation examined the impact that social interactions with different racial and ethnic peer groups have on the development of racial identity and ethnic identity in second generation Vietnamese Americans youth. Dr. Nguyen has been an instructor in the Asian American Studies Program, as well as the Psychology Department at UMASS-Boston and was a recipient of the American Psychological Association Minority Fellowship.
Picture of Julie AhnAllen Julie M. AhnAllen, Ph.D. is a staff psychologist at Boston College, University Counseling Services. She received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Massachusetts, Boston in December 2006. Dr. AhnAllen's clinical interests and expertise are in culturally competent training and practice, racial and ethnic identity development, immigration experiences, Asian American psychology, women's issues, eating disorders, and treatment of anxiety and depression. Her clinical experiences range from community mental health center, university counseling center, and inpatient and outpatient hospital settings. She completed her internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School. Dr. AhnAllen's research focused on racial and ethnic identity development processes of marginalized Asian Americans. Her Master's thesis explored the relationships between physical appearance, sense of belonging, feelings of exclusion, and racial/ethnic self identity among multiracial Japanese-European Americans. Her dissertation examined the development of racial and/or ethnic identities of Asian American women and White European American men experiencing interracial dating.
Picture of Grace Kim Grace S. Kim, Ph.D. is an assistant professor of psychology at Wheelock College. She received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from University of Massachusetts Boston in 2006, and completed an internship and a postdoctoral fellowship at the Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical School, where she worked with children, adolescents, and adults from diverse backgrounds. Dr. Kim's research has two foci: Asian American Psychology and Social Justice Education. With regards to Asian American psychology, she researches experiences of belonging and exclusion, negotiation of racial and ethnic identities, and mental health in Asian Americans. She explores lived experiences of diverse Asian American families, such as transracial adoptees, immigrants, and transnational families. With regards to social justice education, she is interested in exploring how to teach diversity and social justice and ways to help students gain empathy toward others different from themselves. Dr. Kim is a past fellow of the American Psychological Association Minority Fellowship Program, the Institute for Asian American Studies at the University of Massachusetts Boston, and the Asian American Psychological Association Leadership Fellowship Program. She currently serves as a board member of the Asian American Psychological Association.
AART 2012